Benefits of Exercise After Having a Baby

Minimize the Mommy Pooch! 

 2 out of 3 women experience rectus diastasis during pregnancy making it more difficult to flatten your mid-section postpartum. Postpartum muscle weakness and gestational weight gain (GWG) around the middle create an even stronger need for the right kinds of activity and movement when no longer pregnant. Weight loss of up to one pound per week is considered safe and this process is expedited through energy expenditure.  Burning extra calories through exercise will make taking off the GWG a much easier process than if you go at it with food intervention alone.  If you are breastfeeding and exercising you will need to make sure your calories do not drop below 1800 per day, and that you continue to make healthy choices within your diet.

Improved emotional wellbeing

Whether you’ve just had your first, second or 18th child and counting, you’re bound to feel a little overwhelmed and rattled in the aftermath of childbirth.  Throw some sleep deprivation into the mix and it’s no wonder why you may feel exhausted and moody all day long.  For many years, exercise has been shown to improve mood, lower stress and anxiety, boost confidence, and improve sleep patterns. As postpartum depression becomes a growing concern for women and healthcare providers, many are turning to exercise as part of well-rounded plan for postpartum care.  Although your time may be limited, even small bouts of exercise each day have proven physiological benefits making it important to take a moment for yourself and get some activity. Remember, the same perks of exercise before having a baby will continue to benefit the mind and body during this phase of your life.

Reduce risk of incontinence

If you’ve found yourself trying to avoid laughing, sneezing or coughing in public, you’re not alone. Although many women experience some degree of incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum, it can be an embarrassing topic and often left unresolved for long periods of time. Pelvic floor exercises including kegels  have been shown to reduce the risk of incontinence postpartum.  Lower back, abdominal and core exercises provide additional support for the body helping to take pressure off the bladder.  In some cases, surgery may be the best option to resolve your incontinence, so it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions or concerns regarding your bladder health. 

 

The information contained in this article is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for the advice of your physician or licensed health care provider. You should consult your physician or licensed health care provider before engaging in any exercise activity described in this article to determine if it is right for your needs.

 

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The information contained in this article is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for the advice of your physician or licensed health care provider. You should consult your physician or licensed health care provider before engaging in any exercise activity described in this article to determine if it is right for your needs.